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Obamascare: 60% of online Obamacare defenders ‘paid to post’ hits on critics

FILE – In this Oct. 24, 2016 file photo, the HealthCare.gov 2017 web site home page is seen on a laptop in Washington. Add Medicaid expansion to the list of “Obamacare” provisions that Americans want to keep. That’s the conclusion of a new poll, which finds that 8 in 10 U.S. adults say lawmakers should preserve federal funding that has allowed states to add coverage for some 11 million low-income people. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

February 26, 2017

A majority of online and social media defenders of Obamacare are professionals who are “paid to post,” according to a digital expert.

“Sixty percent of all the posts were made from 100 profiles, posting between the hours of 9 and 5 Pacific Time,” said Michael Brown. “They were paid to post.”

His shocking analysis was revealed on this weekend’s Full Measure with Sharyl Attkisson, broadcast on Sinclair stations and streamed live Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Her upcoming show focuses on information wars and Brown was describing what happened when he had a problem with Obamacare and complained online.

Brown said that social media is used to manipulate opinion, proven in the last presidential election.

Sharyl: “What areas of the Internet are used to shape and manipulate opinion?”

Matthew Brown: “Everywhere social. Everywhere social means specific Facebook pages, but it also means the com—, it means the comment sections in every major newspaper.”

He began investigating it after his criticism of the former president’s health insurance program posted on the Obamacare Facebook page. He was hit hard by digital activists pretending to be regular people.

“Digital activists are paid employees; their purpose is to attack anyone who’s posting something contrary to the view of the page owner wants expressed,” he told Attkisson.

She reports that he evaluated 226,000 pro-Obamacare posts made by 40,000 Facebook profiles.

Brown: “Sixty percent of all the posts were made from 100 profiles, posting between the hours of 9 and 5 Pacific Time.”

Sharyl: “Which means what?”

Brown: “They were paid to post.”

He blamed so-called “zombie posts,” and explained them this way: “A zombie post is a fake, purchased, or rented Facebook profile that’s expressing the views of an organization as if it was his or her own. But, when in reality, the comment being expressed is done on software and written by generally one or two people. So, the zombie posts will go out on a schedule and then they are supported by zombie likes.”

And Brown said that both sides play the posting game. “There’s no reason to believe that everybody’s not doing it.”